Summary Of Comments On The Blog 3DCG Life! (3rd Anniversary Update)

Summary Of Comments On The Blog 3DCG Life! (3rd Anniversary Update)

I realize that it has been quite a few years since we opened my blog "3DCG Life" in March 2019.

I am very grateful that so many people are looking at this blog, even though it is a blog that is being run by a handful of people.

I also received comments on our blog posts from more people than we had imagined.

 

In particular, our blog's first posted article, What Working Adult With No 3DCG Experience Does Became 3DCG Artist now has more words in the comments than in the article.

 

I believe that the content of comments from various people with various thoughts is more valuable than the article itself, but the longer the comments are, the more difficult it becomes to read them.

So in this post, I'd like to summarize some of the comments I've received on my blog!

The content of our responses to comments strongly reflects the personal thoughts of Toha, a 3DCG artist of the common man, but we take the time to consider each one carefully and answer them seriously and with sincerity.

I hope you get something out of these comments and the people who commented on them.

 

[Added March 2, 2022]

We originally wrote this article on the first anniversary of the blog, but as we approach our third anniversary, we have updated the content by adding new comments received so far to the article.

 

The number of the added comment is marked with a green marker, so if you only want to read the new comment, you can use the marker as a guide.

 

Thank you also for the many comments on the report that make me happy to read them~! I summarized them :)

 

I was just a programmer, but one thing led to another, and I wanted to be a 3DCG artist!
And then I found your blog!


I had no experience at all in CG and was full of anxiety, but I studied on my own with the help of this blog.
Even when I was about to fall apart, I was encouraged by the words on the blog.
I can work as a 3DCG artist from this spring!

I know it's selfish, but I appreciate it very much!

- Comment by Yuzu -

 

Hi Toha, I read your article and was encouraged.

I am now 32 years old and learned 3DSmax 3 years ago at a vocational school once a week, and now I am in another vocational school to make my work and will be job hunting from now on.
Anyway, I make CG a part of my life and creative work every day.
I am an aspiring modeler and would like to put both characters and backgrounds in a pothole.
I am going to apply for every single job I can to hold on to this industry, even if it is only part-time.
Good to see your article, Toha! I'll do my best!

- Tiger Ike's comment. -

 

I used to work in an industry unrelated to CG, but after reading your blog last year, my desire to become an artist involved in games and images grew, and I have recently decided to change my job to the image industry.
This is all because I read your blog and was encouraged by the fact that there are people who have turned into CG designers from completely different industries. I know this may sound a bit clichéd, but I am glad that I realized that being able to do what you love as a job is a very fun thing to do.


This industry has its difficulties in this industry, but I would like to continue to do my best in the future without forgetting my past efforts.


Thank you so much for publishing the blog that inspired me.

- Chimi's comment -

 

I always read your blog and Twitter.
I have asked the question before and here is the article.
I am looking for a job as a 3DCG designer in general, as described in Q4.
My name is Meo.
Thank you so much for your help on that one!


Life only comes once, after all, and I decided to jump into the gaming industry.
Then, as time went by, I studied at school and looked for a job.
I am currently working as an effects artist.
It was my dream to work in the game industry.
After all, there are many tough situations, and sometimes I almost sigh!
However, the elation and satisfaction I felt when I experienced the moment when something I was involved in was released to the world.
I will never forget the feelings I had when I saw the various feedback from users throughout my life.

It was a difficult decision, and I still think back on it, but I also feel that I am the person I am today because I found a good match. Thank you very much.
I would not have been able to make this decision without Toha.

- Meo's comment -

 

I am a recent newcomer to 3D.
I have always wanted to try modeling people, but the hurdles were too high and I could not get into it. But thanks to this video, I was able to complete a human figure for the first time.


We appreciate it very much. Thank you for making the video.

- Comment by Imo. -

 

Hello Toha, I am a fifth-grader who has been using Blender for a few months.
I found this blog very clear and informative because with reference books it's hard!
I am now looking at Toha's blog/YouTube to build my head and body.

- Comment by yuckey. -

 

I was looking around for Blender for the first time.
I tried to do it, but since I was not very good at manipulating the three-view map, I had to do some weird things to make sure the three-view map was lined up correctly, and I pretty much stopped there.

I feel so much better now that I know that it's okay to think that way even as a beginner.


It was also very easy to read the separate articles, "This operation is detailed here," which helped me to gradually move forward with a task that had been standing still for a long time.
Thank you!

- Pixie's comment. -

 

Reading your comments, Toha, I was able to have my dream of becoming a 3D modeler again, which I had almost given up halfway. Thank you.

- Murata's comment -

 

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Q&A: Employment as a 3DCG artist

General employment opportunities for 3DCG artists

Q1.
After graduating from high school, I had been working as a freelancer for a long time and was thinking that it was time to get a job, when I became interested in 3DCG.

I have no knowledge or skills in 3DCG, and for now, I am studying for the 3DCG certification until I can save up money for my computer and tuition at Digihari.

However, many people say that certification tests are almost meaningless, so should the time spent studying in textbooks be allocated to time spent making them?

Even if I study at Digihari for a year starting in April, I don't think I have much time before job hunting, and I would like to learn 3DCG as efficiently as possible and find a job.

- Comment by Rin -

A1.
To be clear, I don't think a CG certification will give you an advantage in finding a job!

I also have, so I put my CG and color certifications on my resume, but I have never had my qualifications mentioned in an interview.

Even at the document screening stage, we have not heard of any cases where the presence or absence of qualifications was a deciding factor in the selection process. In addition, I have never experienced that the knowledge I studied to acquire the CG certification was useful in my work.

 

So, as for the "certification test is almost meaningless," it is true when it comes to employment.

However, I don't think it is meaningless to say that I studied for a certification. Knowing something as knowledge is certainly more useful than knowing nothing.

As for Toha, I would answer that if Rin-san is looking for a job right away, he should produce 3DCG.

 

However, you are planning to study 3DCG at Digihari for a year starting in April, and now is the time in between, right? If that is the case, I don't think it is a bad idea to take the CG certification test during this period before school starts.

Whether it is a certification exam or 3DCG production, Rin's attitude of actually taking action and trying to do it will lead to employment more than anything else, Toha believes.

 

Q2.
I am currently 29 years old and I am trying to become a 3DCG creator with no study of design at all. I had another interview today, but I was told about my age and that I would have been hired if I were 20-22 years old and at this level, and I almost failed on the spot.

How many people were employed by the company you worked for, Toha?

- Miyoken's comment. -

A2.
You mentioned that your age was mentioned in the interview, but I don't think you need to worry too much - because you have been called for an interview.

If you were trapped by your age, I think you would have failed in the screening process because your age is evident on your resume. The fact that you were invited for an interview means that "even if you are a little older than the age the company wants, there was something about you that they wanted to interview.

 

Now, your question is, "How old were the people employed by the company?

First of all, Toha was 25 years old when I was hired as a 3DCG artist after changing jobs with no experience.
I changed jobs again after that and was 31 years old when I was hired mid-career as a 3DCG artist with work experience.

Neither of the two 3DCG companies that Toha worked for seemed to place much emphasis on age with regard to hiring.

However, there are various timing situations when a company wants to hire young people, when it wants to have an immediate workforce, or when it would rather educate people within the company. If the timing is right, you will be hired. On the other hand, if the timing is not right, you may not be hired even if you have the ability.

 

Even if you worry about your age, it won't make you younger, and I think it's fine that you continue to try to compete with your experience and work as you have in the past.

I was researching designers and their ages and found a few interesting pages, which I will post for your reference.

Toha
Toha

I totally understand the concern about age when changing jobs.

 

Q3.
I went to a job fair for 3DCG professionals with no experience.
So I heard that operations work is in high demand and easy to become even with no experience.

I am interested in being a motion artist, but I want to dive into the 3DCG industry anyway, so I would like to become a 3DCG operator if the job is in high demand.

However, I feel like I can't find almost any jobs for 3DCG operators when I search online. is there really a demand for 3DCG operators?

- Comment by Megumu -

A3.
I'm sorry! I've never heard of a 3DCG operator before!
It's not a word I'm familiar with, at least not as a game-related 3DCG designer.

Please take a look at this article for a summary of the names of 3DCG designers as far as Toha knows.

The job description that you imagine from the term "3DCG operator" is "a person who only operates as instructed (?). In reality, however, there are probably very few jobs for 3DCG artists in which "you don't have to use your head, just move your hands.

Personally, I think that motion artists are much more in demand than 3DCG operators :)

Toha
Toha

In subsequent exchanges, I found out that the 3DCG operator's job is as an assistant job to the 3DCG artist.

 

Q4.
I am currently working in a completely different field, but I have always loved games and have always thought that the 3DCG industry would be a tough but fun world, but I have been unable to take action and I am now 31 years old. However, I have only one life to live, and I am seriously considering changing careers if I want to end up regretting it.

I am still a little worried about the possibility of a person of my age and with no background in design aiming for such a job.

Do you have any experience or stories of people around you who have come from completely different fields after 30 years of age?

- Meo's comment -

A4.
The reality is that there are very few people around Toha who have "changed careers to 3DCG with no experience from a completely different industry after the age of 30.

There are many people over the age of 30 who change jobs, often within the same game industry or from game-related CG to image-related CG. Others are taking advantage of their hobbies and making a new career in 3DCG for games or figures.

So, "changing jobs over 30 itself is common, but often with some relevant experience".

 

From here on out, please listen to this as a story that Toha will do on his own, even though he wasn't asked the question~.

If the reason why Meo-san is wondering whether or not to change jobs is that you have a family to support, for example, you may need to consult with others and be cautious.

But if you are worried about something other than those reasons, I think it is better to have "regrets of doing than regrets of not doing.

It's about which is better: not doing something and later thinking, "I should have done it then..." or actually doing it and then thinking, "Wow, I wish I hadn't done that!"

What if I don't do it! It would be even better if you could think about what you will do in case you decide not to do something!

 

There is one interesting article that I would like to share with you.

This article is about a consultation that says, "My son wants to be a professional actor, but that's kind of hard, isn't it?"

If you replace the actor part with a 3DCG artist, I think there are some aspects that are quite applicable.

Toha
Toha

I'm cheering for you!

[Added January 3, 2022]

Meo-san has commented again to let us know that she has fulfilled her wish and is now working in the game industry as an effects designer!

 

Such a delightful comment from Meo. Please click here. I'm so glad! Thank goodness!

 

Q5.
I have always wanted to be a character modeler, and recently I was able to save up some money, so I left my current job and have been studying MAYA, zbrush, substance painter, photoshop, drawing, and so on.

I am willing to work anywhere as long as I can find a job as a character modeler. I would like to work in a place where I can develop my skills while learning on my own.

This is the situation I am in, but I was wondering if you could give me some advice on what studies I should do, or what kind of company I should try to target for this type of work.

- Comment by RUM -

A5.
I think it's a good idea to make a lot of character models using what you've learned.

When I create 3D models of characters for my work, I create a wide variety of characters. We create cute girls, muscular and handsome men and women of all ages, and even monsters and other animal models as enemy models.

 

Having a character type that you are good at is a weapon, but it would be even better if you can show that you can also create characters other than your specialty type.

Also, since a 3D model of a character is only as good as its final movement, it is useful to be able to set up bones, weights, etc., in addition to modeling.

Toha
Toha

Since there is a deep relationship between character modeling and bones & weights~.

 

Q6.
You mentioned that we need to move the character models such as setup, etc. Should we learn to the stage where we can display the modeled characters in unreal engine or unity?

- Comment by RUM -

A6.
I hope that "it is better to be able to do everything up to setup" can be taken as "it is useful to know" rather than "it is necessary to be able to do it".

Even if you cannot do any setup at all, you can still create a 3D model of a character. However, there is a difference in the finished model between a character model that was created with the idea of moving the character and a character model that was not thought out at all.

If you know a little bit about setup, when you make a model of a character, you can think, "How will it look when I move it?

 

The important thing here is to be able to think, and for that reason, it is "useful to know". If you don't know, you can't think.

If you can do the setup itself perfectly, that might be more useful, but it is not a "must do".

 

The same can be said for Unreal Engine and Unity.

Even if you don't know Unreal Engine or Unity now, you can study and learn them after you join the company.

It's "useful to know," but it doesn't mean you "have to be able to do it." With this in mind, I hope you will think about what you want to prioritize in your studies~.

 

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Q7.
I heard that character moder is a narrow field, and I was wondering if I need to learn motion, effects, etc., and get into the CG industry first, no matter what the job is...

- Comment by RUM -

A7.
Indeed, one strategy is to work for a game company as an effects designer and eventually become a character modeler. This article describes a strategic approach, and there are many references to it.

 

However, if you are hired by a company as an effects designer, you will naturally be working to create effects for the time being.

There are not that many designers who can create effects, so even if you can do character modeling, if there are not many other designers who can create effects, you may be in charge of effects for a long time. (Toha's experience)

 

Both jobs are important to the game and are just as difficult as character modeling.

If you are interested in working on motion and effects, I think it would be very beneficial for you in the future to study and work with them.

But if you are clear enough to say, "What I want to be is a character modeler!" I think it would be better for you to aim for your main goal than to flirt with other things.

Toha
Toha

The time available for studying is not infinite, so you need to prioritize...

 

Q8.
It says that it is easier to get a job as an effects artist than as a character artist. I want to become a character artist, but I don't want to be unable to get a job at a game company.

In that case, should I aim to become an effects artist?

- Comment by Tadataro -

A8.
So-called "character artists" are not the same as "3DCG artists". 3DCG artists sometimes design characters, but it is quite rare.

If you want to be a "character artist," I think it would be more realistic to become a 2D designer or illustrator.

 

If you want to work for a game company, I think it is quite possible to become an effects artist. Or you can learn 2D illustration, 3D modeling, motion, and effects in a broad and shallow way, and aim for a small game company where the artist's work is not divided into separate jobs...

Whatever the case may be, I want to design characters! If you're interested in game creation in general, it's a good idea to try your hand at motion and effects as well.

The reason for this is that by actually doing it, you may find out what you are really interested in.

There are many things that you can't understand the joy of until you try them, so I think it's good to try everything once in the spirit of challenge.

Toha
Toha

Toha tried different jobs and finally settled on being a character modeler.

 

Q9.
Do the character artists use Maya or other software to create 3dcg characters? Is there a division between those who design characters and those who create 3dcg characters?

- Comment by Tadataro -

A9.
If it is a big title game, it is often divided. For example, in titles such as DQ, Tales, Persona, etc., the character artists are usually decided.

Often we commission well-known illustrators from outside the company, especially for the design of main characters. Even in smartphone games, many illustrators are used for character design.

 

Then how about the design of sub-characters and enmities in such cases? I think that in larger companies, "2D artists" often draw them.

In many large companies, the work of artists is divided into a division of labor, and some have in-house 2D art departments. In such cases, it seems that 3DCG artists do not often draw up design drawings.

 

In the case of small companies or small projects, in-house designers sometimes do the whole process from design proposals to 3D model creation. (In fact, Toha did this.)

However, depending on the type of game (for example, a game based on a manga or anime, or a remake or sequel), the character design may already be decided.

 

Q10.
I am a 24-year-old company employee who read this blog and decided that I wanted to make games and started attending a technical school. I would like to know when you decided to leave your first company.
I am still employed, and I am struggling with the thought that it would be better to work for a while to earn money for school expenses, but I feel like I might drag it out on the sly, thinking that I will stop sooner or later.
I have not been able to muster the courage to do so, partly because the relationships in my workplace and the environment in which I work are not that bad.

What were some of the events that led to your decision to leave, Toha?

- figured falconComments by -

A10.
What was the timing of Toha's decision to leave his first company? Yes.

In my case, it was the timing of the "5-year service award. I had been thinking about it since I had been with the company for about three years, and I thought, "If I were to retire from the company, it would be before the five-year award," and as a result, I retired when I had been with the company for four and a half years.

 

He also talks a little about the time when he quit the game company he was working for and was wondering whether or not to change jobs.
As it turned out, I decided when to retire based on my horoscope!

I don't usually look at fortune-telling or anything like that, and even if I do, I quickly forget about it, but I do pick up on it when it suits me and use it as a trigger (lol).

When I was wondering whether or not to change jobs, a friend who liked fortune-telling showed me a fortune that said, "If you are going to quit, it will be in October, and if you are going to start something, it will be in December. So I consulted my fortune and began my job search in earnest, to resign in October.

 

Sometimes, setting a goal or a deadline for yourself can motivate you to do it!

Therefore, when you are having a hard time making up your mind about a decision, it may be a good idea to make a "break" of your own, no matter what it is.

Toha
Toha

It's OK if you miss the deadline you set, as long as it gave you a chance to start running.

 

Q11.
I am a junior (21 years old) attending a university that has nothing to do with 3DCG. I love making things, drawing pictures, animation and games, and I was working hard to create illustrations in the hope that I would be able to get a job like this in the future. From there, I became more attracted to 3D animation, which allows me to move characters with a high range of motion.
So, in the future, I would like to have a job creating 2DCG and 3DCG animations (I would like to work mainly on 3D).

 

However, I started job hunting in March of this year, and I am still lacking in 2DCG animation skills and have barely mastered 3DCG skills, so I feel that it would be difficult to get this kind of job now.

I would like to start studying 3DCG animation and eventually get a job in such a related field, but I am wondering whether I should get a job at a completely unrelated company for now and learn 3DCG in parallel with my job, or whether I should concentrate on my studies without job hunting.

- NOKISHITA.Comments by -

A11.
I see! It is indeed a very annoying problem...

I have thought a lot about what I would do, and what would be the best way to do it, but I vote for "get a job for now and study 3DCG while working"! There are three reasons why I vote for "get a job for now".

 

(1) Even if it is not directly related to 3DCG, I think the experience of working in a company as a member of society will be useful.
(2) I haven't started working with 3DCG yet, so I think I can consider whether I want to work with it or not after I learn a little more about it.
(3) Even if I don't get a job in 2DCG or 3DCG right away, I can keep my peace of mind financially if I can get other jobs.

 

(1) The strength of changing from a different job to 3DCG. As I wrote in the article, this is what I feel from my experience in Toha.

(2) Since you originally worked in illustration and 2D animation, I think you are just starting to work on 3DCG. Therefore, I thought that if you think you can do it, you might try to do a little more 3DCG on your own while doing another job, and then make a decision.

(3) I think that having a job and an income and not having to worry about finances is a good way to relax your mind. If you want to study 3DCG seriously, you may be able to choose to go to a 3DCG vocational school with the money you earn from your work.

 

It is easy to say, but in reality, it is also very difficult to find a job.
That's why I hope that you'll think about it as much as you can right now, and finally decide which one you can do without regret. I hope you will decide which one you can do without regret and do your best!

 

Q12.

I am currently self-taught in blender and would like to eventually work in the 3DCG industry.
My current job has nothing to do with 3DCG.

Due to my current job, I feel it is difficult to learn while attending school, so I am studying on my own, but would it be better to learn at a school?

Also, when I look at 3DCG jobs, I see that many companies require working experience. Is it better to work part-time in 3DCG to gain working experience?

- Comment by Tsuru -

A12.
I don't think that you have to study at a school to change jobs, or that it is easier to find a job if you go to a school.
In the end, the most important thing in finding or changing jobs in the 3DCG industry is your portfolio (your work), so there is no problem if you can complete your own work even if you are self-taught.

In fact, recently we have seen more and more cases where people have uploaded a lot of independent works on social networking sites, etc., which led to jobs.

Even if you have difficulty attending school, you can still Udemy and the Menta. There are also paid materials and courses that can be learned on a spot basis, such as the following, so why not consider the method that best fits your lifestyle?

 

Then again, some work experience is better than none. I think you are very lucky if you can see the 3DCG production process from a part-time job. Even before the work experience, I think the best thing you can get out of it is that you can get to know the professionals who are working on 3DCG production and hear their stories about their work.

However, if there are no good part-time job openings, you would try applying to companies that do not include years of work experience as a requirement for 3DCG jobs, or those that say that no experience is required.

 

If there is a company that you want to work for, but that requires years of work experience, you can send an email to the company that allows you to inquire about hiring, and ask, "Can I apply even if I don't have work experience?"
When the number of years of work experience is written in the job description, it is almost always the case that they are looking for people who are ready to work immediately, so it is entirely possible that you will be told not to apply, but if you are lucky or have good timing, you may be told to "just apply and we'll take a look".

Toha
Toha

There are many ways to study CG nowadays.

 

Q13.

I am in the process of changing jobs from a different industry to become a background modeler.
I am currently applying mainly to companies where I can apply even if I have no experience, and I have passed the first round of interviews with a few companies and am now in the final round of interviews.

I would appreciate any advice on what questions will be asked in the final interview (I know it depends on the company, of course) and what I should prepare for.
Also, what is the actual pass rate for the final interview? I would like to know how many people actually pass the final interview.

- Deitch's comment. -

A13.
What will be asked in the final interview...sorry, but I honestly don't know~
They asked me questions that I had not expected at all when I was in Toha lol.
(For more information, please visit →)What Are 3 Things Absolutely Need To In Life? - A Story Of The Question Asked Job Interview)
Also, the rate of passing the final interview is sometimes something that Toha cannot even consider.

 

However, this is not much of a story in my interview experience so far, but when I made it to the final interview, I received a job offer as a result.
If the company is not that big and you are interviewing for a mid-career job, I think the company is often interviewing because they want to hire you.

 

So I think it would be a good idea for you to go into the interview with the intention of getting to know Deitchi well.
If you don't pass the final interview, it just means that you didn't fit with the company, and you should be positive that you have a chance to find a company that suits you better.

Toha
Toha

Good luck with the interview~!

 

Q14.

I am a 29-year-old currently looking to start studying CG.
My question is, does age matter in the growth of CG talent? Also, can a person without talent become a CG artist?

- Yutan's comment -

A14.
Regarding Yutan's question, I would like to answer it in the Toha way.

First, "Does age have anything to do with the growth potential of CG talent?" I don't think age has anything to do with the growth potential of CG talent. However, since there is not an infinite amount of time in a person's lifetime, I think that "the younger you are, the more time you have to develop your talent.

 

Next, "Do you have to be talented to be a CG artist?" I didn't know what talent was, so I looked it up.
Some dictionaries say "the innate ability to do things skillfully," but if you look up the meaning of the word in Kojien, it says "wit and ability. Some dictionaries say "the innate ability to do things skillfully. Talent" certainly includes innate qualities, but it seems that "ability acquired through training" is also a part of talent.

 

Based on the above, Toha's answer is.

"1) you can't become a computer graphics artist without talent, and 2) talent can be acquired through training."

I think it is up to each person to decide whether to give up trying because they don't have the talent at this point, or whether to train and acquire the talent and try to take on the challenge.

 

I don't know if your goal is to work for a CG company or to work as an independent CG artist, but I can't tell you if you can become a CG artist if you try, but if you don't try, the day when you can become a CG artist will never come.

I don't think there is anyone who has no worries in life, so I hope that you will explore various options while worrying and thinking about them, and then decide what you want to do in the future.
And since only Yutan can make that decision!

 

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Questions about the portfolio

Portfolio~.

Q15.
I often hear that sketching is required, but is it necessary to have a level of work that will pass art school...?

- Comment by RUM -

A15.
I'm often told that sketching is required for portfolios and the like - but don't worry, you're not required to have the level of sketches needed to pass art school :)

The reason why people say that sketching is necessary for 3DCG production is not that one needs good sketching skills, but because the "observational skills" needed to draw sketches are necessary for 3DCG production, in Toha's opinion.

 

Drawing develops the power of the observing eye, so I think it can be used as a basis for judgment as "good sketching = good observation skills.

But even if the sketches are not good, if the quality of the 3DCG work is high, the artist's ability can be recognized by the quality of the 3DCG work.

 

Q16.
I am currently working on my portfolio, should I also have some drawing work to become a modeler? If it is required, I have never done it before and would like to study it.

- Comment by Osugi -

A16.
I'm wondering if I should include drawings in my portfolio.

Whether or not you need drawings to apply for a job varies from company to company. Some companies state that several drawings are required in their application guidelines, while others do not require any drawings but ask that you show them your 3DCG work.

 

However, as long as there are companies that require sketching in order to apply, there is nothing better than being able to draw.

I have never studied sketching properly, but there was an optional class called "Art Drawing Class" at Digihari, so I participated in it and studied a little.

After that, I did some sketches on my own, and only the two final sketches that I did well were included in my portfolio.

Also, there was a company that required sketches as a practical skill test during the interview, so I practiced drawing lots of sketches at home before the interview.

 

Therefore, I think it is a good idea to sketch at least once so that you will be prepared if you have to draw a sketch somewhere.

It is also a good idea to study on your own with the help of online articles and videos or take a short-term drawing class or something.

Toha
Toha

Drawings used to be the standard for portfolios.

 

Q17.
I am trying to switch from a character modeler to a background modeler, but since I never touched 3d when I was a student, I only have 2d work.

Even if I wanted to increase the number of works, I cannot update my works very often because of the tight deadlines for work to be done in between jobs.

We understand that you were working on the assignment while holding down your current job.

- Comment by Ama Party -

A17.
It was difficult for Toha, too, when he was working for a game company and creating a portfolio for his new job.

While I liked it, I didn't do a lot of character modeling for work, and I didn't have a model of a character that I could put in my portfolio. I decided to create a completely new and original character for my portfolio.

 

So, the main question is, "How did you make time for production?"

Toha made it a point to arrive at the office an hour or two early each day. So, he used the time until someone else came to the office as his production time. It is a good learning experience for artists to work on 3DCG outside of work hours, so there is no prohibition against it.

If I made progress for an hour each day, I could get it done pretty well, but I took a paid leave of absence to do the last major part of the project at home.

In the game development business, there are times when the busyness of the work slows down after the submission of ROMs or at the end of a project. I took advantage of this time to take a two-week long vacation, including time off to make up for holidays I had accumulated from working on weekends and holidays up to that point.

Toha
Toha

(I had been working on my new job under the radar, so I was making my work in secret.)

 

Q18.
I am 22 years old and joined an engineering company this April as a new graduate.

I originally wanted to become a CG creator but gave it up once, and now I'm thinking of taking action because I don't want to give up. So my question is this.

 

(1) What level of quality is required for the portfolio for submission?

(2) How many pieces would you like to have?

(3) Is Maya still the better software to use instead of Blender?

- Comment by hoshiya -

A18.
I would like to respond to your question below, although there are some things that Toha cannot know.

 

(1) What is the required quality of the portfolio for submission?

I'm sorry, but I don't know because Toha is not a recruiter for the company that Hoshiya wants to work for - a recruitment agent or other person might know more than Toha because he/she might have seen many portfolios of applicants.

 

(2) How many pieces of work should be in a portfolio?

As for the 3DCG artist's portfolio, this article is all that Toha can tell you about it. Please read it if you like.
How To Make CG Portfolio 1) - More Important Is How To Think

 

(3) Should I use Maya instead of Blender as software?

If you can make 3DCG in Blender, you can make it in Maya with a little learning, even if the software is changed to Maya.
However, although Blender is becoming more and more popular, Maya is the most widely used software in the game industry.

 

Q19.
What is the best number of works to include in a portfolio? Also, do you think it is better to have a consistent theme or genre of work, or is it better to have a variety of different types of work in the portfolio?

- Comment from Solamame. -

A19.
It's hard to say - I'll be honest with you, Toha, I don't know what's "best"!
But you may be able to get some of the "better" choices.

 

Silicon Studio, a recruitment agency that deals mainly with game and video-related fields, has an article about the number of works and pages in a portfolio.

It says here that "the number of works is generally 10 to 20 works and the total number of pages is 12 to 30 pages. Incidentally, when I counted the number of pages in the portfolio I created when I changed jobs for the second time, it was 18 pages. However, there were only a few works that were not for business projects, so I used 3 or 4 pages for the works I wanted to show as the main part of my portfolio.

 

Also, should the theme or genre of the work be consistent? I think it depends on the situation of the applicant.
For example, if you are applying to a place that explicitly says "character modelers wanted," you don't need a background model. But you might want to have a wide range and variety of character models.
On the other hand, if the application guidelines do not specify the type of work, you may want to include a balance of various works, such as characters and backgrounds, in your portfolio.

 

The "better" choice depends on who the portfolio is intended to be shown to.

But I think we can get a few clues if we think about the people we show them to.

Toha
Toha

Other Silicon Studio articles as well might be of interest to you.

 

Q20.
Is it OK to incorporate such materials into my work and include them in my portfolio?

I created the main characters and buildings myself, but because I did not have time, I purchased the grass and tree models from the asset store and placed them.
I would like to know if the company is looking for a picture that is not 100% made by your own hands, or if they are looking for someone with compositional and comprehensive skills who can create a good picture even using existing materials.

- Poppo's comment. -

A20.
Toha is not a corporate recruiter, so this is just my personal opinion...

I think it is "OK to use assets" - I think is "OK to use assets".
However, as Mr. Poppo mentioned, it is necessary to state "the part I created/used assets" so that the other party can understand what part you actually created and from where.
Also, assets should only play a supporting role in the work, and not become the main part of the work...rather than the part that was created.

 

If an interviewer asks you, "Why did you use assets for this part of the project?" Ideally, you should be able to answer why and for what purpose.

If the reason is because it was a hassle to make something, or because you wanted to make it easier, it is difficult to answer the question.

 

Whether or not companies are looking at picture-making composition skills, etc... I can't answer that question because I don't know a bit toha, but my answer would be something like this.

 

About the support stance of this blog

Q21.
If you don't mind, I would like to show you an animated film.

- Miyoken's comment. -

A21.
As for the content of the work, I think I will only give my personal pure impression of Toha.

This blog is operated to support those who aspire to become 3DCG artists, but this is the extent of our support and we do not plan to provide any kind of job placement assistance in the future.

We feel that checking and pointing out the contents of each person's 3DCG work is too much work for a single 3DCG artist like Toha.

I have been working as a 3DCG artist for a long time, but I am not a great or famous 3DCG artist...

So, I may give an ordinary impression when I see your work, but I'd still like to show it to you if you don't mind.

 

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Q&A: 3DCG schools and study

About 3DCG School

Hm-hmm...

Q22.
I'm really wondering if I should go to a technical school or an online school.

I'm sure there are advantages and disadvantages to each, but is it difficult to do without actually attending the school?

- Tanima's comment. -

A22.
I don't think it is difficult to study 3DCG without attending a technical school - I don't think so.

Most online 3DCG schools offer video materials by instructors, and recently, some offer chat tools such as Slack to interact with instructors and students.

 

Here are some of the advantages of online schools that Toha thought were worth mentioning.

  • It doesn't matter if the technical school is physically far away.
  • Flexibility in study time because you don't have to attend school.
  • Tuition is a bit cheaper than a commuter course.

The advantages of attending a vocational school are as follows. (other than what I wrote about in the article)

  • You can see other students' assignments and hear the instructor's critique of them.
  • Access to computers and other equipment at the school.

 

I think it depends on your situation as to whether commuter school or online is a better fit for you. Distance to school, tuition budget, and time availability are also factors.

I am sure you will have endless worries, but whichever you choose, I am sure you will get something out of it. Once you have done your research and agonized over it to your satisfaction, all you have to do is just say, "Yes! and make a decision.

 

Q23.
I am considering enrolling in the main course at Digital Hollywood.

I was thinking of enrolling because I find the free time attractive, but is it possible that the number of PCs will be reduced about the number of students during the free time?

Also, maybe I care too much, but I think there are a lot of bad reviews. I am not qualified to study when I worry about such things! But I am still worried about what I worry about, so I would like to hear your unquantifiable opinion.

- Comment by nameless person -

A23.
First, "Are there ever enough PCs for the number of students?" Regarding.

  • It was not at the time of the Toha.
  • But since the time and place are different, you should contact Digihari directly.

Next, "Does DigiHari have a bad reputation?" About.

  • Toha did not consider DigiHari to be a good school.
  • But I don't know how it compares to other vocational schools.

I understand that you are concerned/worried about the bad reputation. If there is another school that has a better reputation than Digihari and you think it looks better, you should choose that school.

I think the important thing is that the unnamed person goes to a school that he or she has "chosen with conviction".

Tuition is not cheap, and since you are spending a good amount of time in school, it is natural to be concerned and cautious. But perhaps no school is completely free of bad publicity.

 

No matter which school you go to, it is never a total waste of money or time. Whether or not it will be a waste depends on the person's mindset.

Once you are convinced and have chosen which school to go to, all you have to do is study hard!

 

Q24.
I am a senior in high school and have already decided on a university, and I would like to enter a game company in the future.

I'm going to study information science at university and have classes in 3dcg, but I don't think I'll be able to find a job after graduating from university when I see articles on the internet about working for a game company.

Would it still be better to attend a vocational school?

- Comment by Tadataro -

A24.
First of all, as a basic premise, going to a technical college does not necessarily guarantee a job at a game company. Is it more advantageous to work for a game company at a technical college than at a university? I don't think anyone knows the answer to this question for sure either.

This is because I think it depends on the circumstances of each company whether they want to take college graduates or vocational school, graduates.

 

For Toha, I think that "what you studied and what kind of work you created" - in other words, your portfolio - is much more important than "what school you graduated from".

Since the university you are planning to go to also offers 3DCG classes, why don't you first take a class at the university and then think about it again?

If you feel that the university course content is not sufficient for your needs, you can study the missing material on your own or take online courses if necessary.

If you still cannot study what you want to study, then one way is to quit college and attend a vocational school.

 

Q25.
I am currently a senior in high school and have a dream of becoming a 3DCG artist.

So now I am wondering if I should go to an art college or a vocational school. From the perspective of someone who is actually involved in the industry, is there any difference between getting a job after graduating from an arts college and getting a job after graduating from a technical college?

- Hirohiro NagaoComments by -

A25.
I think the biggest difference between an art college and a vocational school is "what you study while in school.
If you compare the curriculum of a technical college with that of an art college, you will find that there is a difference in what is taught.
So, as a toha, I think it would be better for Mr. Nagao to go to a school that has a curriculum that he genuinely wants to study.

If you need to do something on the job that you did not learn in school after joining a company, you just need to study it again. In fact, there are a lot of new things to learn after you start working.

 

You may find this article helpful for a comparison of universities and technical schools, etc.
Which is more advantageous to learn game development, technical college or university? Explanation of the post-employment process
To be honest, do I need to have an educational background to get a job or change jobs in the game industry?

 

I'm sorry, but I don't know if what is written in the article is true or if it is still the case today.
However, I think it can be useful as a factor in making a decision, so I would like you to consider various options.

 

 

How to study 3DCG

bicorn

Q26.
I am currently using Maya at work, but I have a lot of revision work to do and can't learn the functions I don't touch very often. I would like to know if you know of any good sites where I can learn on my own.

- Comment by Ama Party -

A26.
Regarding the "I can't remember Maya functions that I don't touch in my daily work" problem. This was almost the same for me too that is why I am not that familiar with the detailed functions of Maya~.

Toha's stance on studying is that "the time to study is when it becomes necessary for work," and studying itself is not often the objective.

However, there is a knowledgeable artist in my company who knows a lot of things, and I have been trying to keep this in mind since I was inspired by him. That is.

 

Questioning whether there is actually a better way to do a task that is always repeated in the same way.

 

Here it is.

If you create 3DCG everyday as part of your job, you will gradually become accustomed to your "usual way of doing things. And once you get used to that way of doing things, you don't try to find a new way of doing things.

So every once in a while, I deliberately and consciously think, "Isn't there another way to do this?" I think about it.

We will investigate to see if there is another way to do it, and if we discover it, we will try that way. In the process, I often learn new Maya features that I didn't know existed.

I don't want to spend all my time researching when I'm busy working every day! But I think that by daring to do so, I may be able to increase my knowledge little by little~!

Toha
Toha

A knowledgeable artist also said, "I don't study anything in particular, I just look things up when I don't understand something. Can you become more knowledgeable the more actively you look things up?

 

Q27.
I feel that to become a character artist, I need to be able to draw people, animals, plants, buildings, etc. Every day I write comic book covers, favorite character landscapes, and anything else I can think of.

To be honest, I don't feel that my drawing skills will improve, and I think it would be better to continue with this, get used to blender and Maya, and create artwork. Which would be better?

- Comment by Tadataro -

A27.
I think that painting every day will definitely be a plus if you keep at it.

I assume that you are copying from other pictures, since it is the cover of a comic book, and copying is very good training for your observational skills.

Even if we put aside for the moment the question of whether it will improve your drawing skills or whether you can become a character artist, I think it will be useful enough because observation skills are essential for 3DCG creation.

So, even if you don't have to stop painting to make 3DCG, it would be even better if you could make 3DCG works in other time while painting a little bit every day.

 

Q28.
I am currently a senior in high school. Now that I am deciding on a career path, I am drawn to the position of motion designer. So my question is.

 

1. do you think I would be able to improve my skills more if I enter a vocational school or a college of design?

2. and if I choose a vocational school, what should I do from now until I enroll?

- Comment by nanashi -

A28.
I am not that familiar with motion-related issues, but I will try to answer in my own way.

 

1.

If you want to become a 3DCG motion artist, your skills will improve if you study at a school that teaches motion production using 3DCG. The technology we are talking about here means "the technology to create motion using 3DCG software," but to create motion using 3DCG, it is better to have knowledge of 2D animation as well.

The final image on the screen is 2D, which is why the concept of 2D animation is necessary for 3DCG motion production. Those who studied 2D animation in school learned how to use 3DCG software after joining a company.

 

2.

Watch lots of cool animations and well-motivated videos!

It doesn't matter if it's a 2D animation, a special cut-in from a game, or anything else, it's good to see a variety of good images every day, even if it's just a little bit.
In a modeling article on this blog, I write about how to make good models see a lot of good models," I write.
This story goes back to motion production, and it's better to know and see a lot of good motion to make a good motion - this is definitely something you should be doing!

 

About 3DCG production computers

personal computer

Q29.
I would like to practice 3dcg, but I do not have a computer. What specs do I need to have in order to get a computer?

- Comment by Amber Shiina -

A29.
It's so hard to know what specs to buy for a computer!

I did a little research on the computer specs needed for 3DCG, and this site explains it all in simple terms!

If I may excerpt from what you have written, it seems to me that you should pay attention to these three points.
CPU → Select "Core i7"
Memory → Select "16 GB or more".
Graphics board → Select "GeForce 1070 or higher" or "Quadro 2000 or higher

 

Also, as for where to buy a computer, a computer like the one used for 3DCG is not available at ordinary electronics stores. I think it is better to buy on the Internet.

I bought it at an online store called "Mouse Computer". The website I mentioned earlier recommends "PC Kobo" and "dospara" stores.

 

Q30.
I would appreciate it if you could tell me the specs of the first PC that you bought, Toha.

- Comment by Amber Shiina -

A30.
I'll expose the specs of the computer that Toha is currently using~.

 

Computer type: Desktop computer
OS: Windows 10 Home
Manufacturer: Mouse Computer
Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4770 CPU @ 3.40GHz
Mounted memory: 16.0 GB
System type: 64-bit operating system
Graphics Board: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660

 

I honestly don't think it is such a good spec.

However, Maya and Blender are working without any problems at the moment, so I think the minimum specs are sufficient.

 

Q31.
I would like to know if my current computer is suitable for cg production.

 

Computer information
Computer type: Laptop
PC Name: m-Book K686XN-M2SH2
OS: Windows 10 Home 64 bit
Manufacturer: mouse
Processor: Intel® Core™ i7-7700HQ processor
Mounted memory: 16GB (8GB x 2 / dual channel)
Graphics Board: GeForce® MX150 / Intel® HD Graphics 630 MX150 / Intel® HD Graphics 630

- Pumpkin's comment. -

A31.
I saw your computer information.
I don't know much about the specs involved, so I looked into the toha as well!

In conclusion, I think that Mr. Pumpkin's computer is generally fine - the only concern is the graphics board.

 

Referring to the article on the website we referred to, the minimum graphics board required for Blender is "Geforce MX110 or higher".

Pumpkin's computer is an MX150, so it meets the necessary requirements. However, it is hard to meet the requirements for the recommended graphics board.

What happens if the graphics board does not meet the recommended requirements? Sorry, I don't know for sure. I think it would be best to confirm this by actually installing Maya or Blender.

Toha
Toha

For a discussion of monitors suitable for 3DCG rather than the computer itself, see please refer to the article Summary of how to choose a good monitor for your production.

 

About 3DCG Software

GOGO

Q32.
I am planning to enroll in a technical school for my 4th year next year to learn 3dcg. I would like to get early exposure to 3dcg, so I was wondering if you could recommend a suitable 3dcg software for beginners?

- Pumpkin's comment. -

A32.
In the broadest sense of the word, "suitable 3DCG software for beginners" means
The Toha believes that there is no such thing.

This is because all 3DCG software is difficult for newcomers to get used to, and once a user gets used to using one software, they often find other 3DCG software difficult to use.

In the case of Mr. Pumpkin, since he plans to go to a technical school next year, I think it would be a good idea to use the 3DCG software that the school uses for its classes.

 

3DCG software is only a tool for creating 3DCG.

To use an analogy, when making a cutout, do you use scissors or a butter knife? It is like this. Scissors and a cutter knife are used in different ways, but "how to make paper cutouts" is the same even if the tools are different. I think the technical school you are going to is essentially a place to learn "how to make 3DCG. Of course, it is also necessary to learn how to use the tools.

 

Q33.
I'm trying to learn Maya, but it's too expensive for me to afford it. Should I just get used to Blender as a Maya replacement?

- Comment by Tadataro -

A33.
I think that's fine - if you can make 3DCG in Blender, you will be able to make 3DCG in Maya or 3dsMax in no time.

Of course, there are many differences in the way software is used, but the fundamental method of creating 3DCG is the same even if the software is different. Therefore, Toha does not think it is necessary to worry too much about the difference in 3DCG software.

Toha
Toha

I went to a technical school for 3dsMax → Maya at my company → Now I'm thinking of Blender's toha!

 

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Q&A: 3D Model Creation

About the character models used in the blog

♪

Q34.
We are making doujin games, etc., and we would like to ask if we could sell this body on BOOTH or something like that. We are having a hard time finding enough materials to use as a base body.

- Comment by catfish -

A34.
Currently, we do not plan to sell the body of this model anywhere. This is because we do not think it is easy to use as a body model for the following reasons.

  • It was never intended to be animated in the first place.
  • Not much versatility in the limb portion of the design.

However, after receiving Nekodamashi's comment this time, I wondered if there is such a demand for this type of service. I think there is a possibility that the model may be scrutinized to make it easier to use in the future and sold in some form or other. I think there is a possibility that we will sell the model in some form or another, after careful examination to make it easier to use in the future.

If we ever sell any elemental models made by Toha, we will let you know on our blog and Twitter.

Incidentally, there are also some low-poly elements available on BOOTH.

Even if you don't find the perfect fit for the game you want to create, if the model is OK to modify, it may be easier to create a character model than to create one from scratch.

 

Toha
Toha

What a surprise! In October 2020, we launched the low-poly element "Lopo-san Series" at Toha's BOOTH store - please have a look!

 

Q35.
I would like to create a 3D model based on Secchan and use it in my own game if it is OK with you.

The reference is the head height and body shape, not the design of the hair, clothes, etc.

We are also looking at earning income from our games in the future (e.g., selling completed games, making them into apps, earning advertising revenue, etc.).

What do you think about the possibility of creating a game using Setschan's 3D model and the 3D model referenced in this article, and possibly earning money from it?

 

Explanation Setcchan Blueprint

- Ruby's comment. -

A35.
You want to create a model for your own game based on the head height and body shape of Secchan's model, and I hope you will find it useful :)

ExplanationSecchan's copyrighted material belongs, of course, to the person who created it, Toha.

However, creating your own 3D model based on the character's head, body shape, and other elements is not an infringement of any rights, and we do not see any problem with it.

I don't think there is any problem at all with creating a game using the 3D models created in this way and earning money from game sales, advertising revenue, etc.

 

The model of Secchan was created to explain modeling, etc. on this blog. Naturally, we also assume that readers of the blog will model the model by referring to the blog and imitating Secchan's model.

It is a great learning experience to try to make something by copying it, and Setsuchan was born to do so, and I hope he will be able to use it as a reference by copying it to a great extent.

 

However, copying is only for practice and study. To present your model to the world as your creation, you need to take it one step further and incorporate original designs and elements.

We still need to prepare bones, weights, etc. to make the 3D models we created work in games, but we are looking forward to the day when Ruby's characters work in games!

 

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Questions about 3D modeling

?

Q36.
Is it still difficult to model characters unless you have a certain level of artistic ability and drawing ability?

- Comment from 5th generation Kanegon -

A36.
First of all, Toha is not good at drawing. But I can model characters. For Toha, drawing is more difficult than modeling.

 

Putting textures aside for the moment, purely in terms of modeling and modeling, you don't need to have good drawing skills. What is necessary is to "observe well and capture the shape of the object."

Textures are 2D illustrations that are pasted onto 3D models, so this one has a little bit to do with drawing ability and artistic ability. However, this does not mean that you need to have good drawing skills.

Since there are many useful functions and software for drawing textures in 3DCG, you can make up for your lack of drawing ability by making full use of them. In addition, textures can actually be drawn to some extent theoretically by "observing and capturing the texture of an object.

 

There are many types of 3DCG in the world, such as cell-look and photo-realistic, but I think that 3D models with a "hand-drawn illustration style" are the ones that require the most drawing ability and artistic spirit.

For example, in the Atelier series (the latest Liza's Atelier) character models such as a touch of texture can really affect the quality of the 3D model.

In the case of a character model like this, I think that the artistic spirit is also a very important factor.

 

Q37.
I made each part in the creation of the character model, but when I animate the model, the space between each part is torn off.

I understand that this is because the parts are not connected, but I struggle with this because I lack knowledge of the methods used to attach the parts.

 

From what I've been able to find out, in Blender, the

  1. Cut the part to be connected according to the figure of the connection source at the low poly stage → "Bridge Edge Loop [Ctrl+E]" to join the parts.
  2. Using a boolean, "Difference" → "Merge" → Merge Objects [Ctrl+J].

I found a way to do this.

  1. is difficult to cut the connection site when the number of vertices of the connection source and destination is large (for example, when attaching a sphere and a cube).
  2. is a case where the spacing between connected vertices is too close or overlaps, and it takes time to correct.

I have made a couple of pieces like that, but I am currently not comfortable with either approach.

- Comment by ARI. -

A37.
In the way of modeling at Toha, it is more common to "connect parts by extrusion from the beginning" than to "connect parts later".

Of course, there are times when parts made separately are joined together later. For example, the head and body are made separately and later joined at the neck.

The reason why the head was not made by extruding it from the body is that I thought, "It is easier and cleaner to connect this part later than to make it by extrusion.

 

Whenever we make 3D models, we always think about how to make them easy and beautiful. It may sound like we are cutting corners when we say "make it easy," but that is not the case.

Easier creation means fewer steps and less tedious work. The less tedious work you have to do, the more time you have to focus on the details you want in your 3D model.

Besides, the reason we want to make it easy is to make it beautiful.

How can we make it easier and more beautiful? If you think about how to make it from the viewpoint of "How can I make it easier and more beautiful?

 

However, I think what ARI wants to know the most is how do you connect objects? I will answer that question as well.

Toha often uses theVertex Snapfunction. For example, when attaching the head and body to the neck, the vertex at the base of the neck, which is created by pushing out from the head, is snapped to the vertex of the part of the body where the neck is to be connected and aligned exactly.

Once alignedvertex mergeConnect them with the Once the head and body objects have been merged, theSewing union of verticesto connect vertices

 

The method of connecting vertex-snap joints is almost the same as using the bridge function to attach them. If the number of vertices is too different between the parts to be connected, it is difficult to match the number of vertices.

But since Toha always thinks about "how to make it easy and clean," I think I probably do it differently in those cases - I think.

The reason why we use many extrusions in our modeling is that we think it is easier and more beautiful to make extrusions than to connect them later.

Toha
Toha

Sometimes the only way to make a model is to use a method that is a pain in the neck, or sometimes we dare to use a more time-consuming method to make a prettier model.

 

Q38.
My current goal is to create 3D characters, ships, and objects in the future, but I wonder if the ease of creation will differ between people and objects. Also, in the case of characters, does the ease of creation differ depending on gender?

- Mitarashi's comment. -

A38.
There is a slight difference in the way of making something that does not have a definite shape, such as a person, and something that has a definite shape, such as an object.

Therefore, there may be differences in which is easier or more fun to make depending on the person who makes it. You won't know for sure until you try making either one yourself, so by all means, give it a try~!

 

Another difference in ease of character creation depending on the gender of the character is that it depends on the preference of the person creating the character. Some people are good at creating cute girls, some are good at creating muscular gaming characters, and some are good at creating monsters and creatures... I model all kinds of characters in my work, but if you are good at creating cute characters, it may be difficult to create muscular macho characters, and vice versa. (Of course, some people are good at both.)

 

So it is hard to say how it is all the same, but one theory is that it is more difficult to make a male character look cool than to make a female character look cute.
In particular, there are many cases in which a 2D drawing of a handsome male character in an anime-style drawing would fail if it were modeled in 3D as is.

Toha
Toha

Toha makes both men and women, but mainly anime-style pictures, so I'm not good at photo-realistic ones.
I enjoy creating anime-style models more, simply because I like them better.

 

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Extra: About happy comments!

♪

I couldn't show you everything in this article, but thank you very much for all your comments!

I'm always happy to receive any kind of comment, but I'd like to share a few thoughts on some of the comments that made me especially happy...

 

Comments such as "it was easy to understand," "it was interesting," etc.

We write every article on this blog with the motto, "Be easy to understand."

So just a single word, "It was easy to understand," makes me very happy and relieved.

I think many people don't bother to say "easy to understand" or "interesting" even if they think so. But that's why I'm glad to hear them say so.

Receiving positive feedback, in particular, motivates us to "work hard again" when making things. I think this is true not only for Toha but for all people who are making things in the world, more or less.

 

So, even if it's not about this blog, I want everyone to feel free to say "I like", "It was good", or "It's interesting" about any game or animation they like.

It is quite possible that the people who created the book will see such a small comment somewhere, and it will make them happy and encourage them to do their best again.

 

Toha
Toha

I'd be happy to hear your thoughts on Twitter.

 

Comments that point out mistakes or areas that were difficult to understand

This is soooo much appreciated!

Although we take care to write our blog posts so that the content is something that Toha can responsibly disseminate, there are times when we write things that are not correct due to a lack of knowledge, or parts that are difficult for others to understand.

When I notice it myself, I revise the article, but sometimes I don't notice it and leave it at that.

I deeply appreciate your comments that make me aware of those areas - m(_ _)m

 

Comments such as "I read your blog and decided to try it, I was able to do it for the first time, etc.

Really, I'm glad I created this blog and wrote articles about it. It makes me cry a little.

And the people who have commented on my blog range from elementary school students at the bottom to people in their 70s at the top.

I am deeply impressed by the fact that so many different people in the world are interested in 3DCG or want to make it their career... I think that we, too, need to be more diligent in our work...

heartily

 

And, you know, after being a blogger for so long, recently I've had the opportunity to receive comments like, "My dream has come true, I'm a 3DCG artist now!

I have compiled a list of comments on the happy and joyous news here.

I was just a programmer, but one thing led to another, and I wanted to be a 3DCG artist!
And then I found your blog!

I had no experience at all in CG and was full of anxiety, but I studied on my own with the help of this blog.
Even when I was about to fall apart, I was encouraged by the words on the blog.
I can work as a 3DCG artist from this spring!

I know it's selfish, but I appreciate it very much!

- Comment by Yuzu -

 

Hi Toha, I read your article and was encouraged.

I am now 32 years old and learned 3DSmax 3 years ago at a vocational school once a week, and now I am in another vocational school to make my work and will be job hunting from now on.
Anyway, I make CG a part of my life and creative work every day.
I am an aspiring modeler and would like to put both characters and backgrounds in a pothole.
I am going to apply for every single job I can to hold on to this industry, even if it is only part-time.
Good to see your article, Toha! I'll do my best!

- Tiger Ike's comment. -

 

I used to work in an industry unrelated to CG, but after reading your blog last year, my desire to become an artist involved in games and images grew, and I have recently decided to change my job to the image industry.
This is all because I read your blog and was encouraged by the fact that there are people who have turned into CG designers from completely different industries. I know this may sound a bit clichéd, but I am glad that I realized that being able to do what you love as a job is a very fun thing to do.


This industry has its difficulties in this industry, but I would like to continue to do my best in the future without forgetting my past efforts.

Thank you so much for publishing the blog that inspired me.

- Chimi's comment -

 

I always read your blog and Twitter.
I have asked the question before and here is the article.
I am looking for a job as a 3DCG designer in general, as described in Q4.
My name is Meo.
Thank you so much for your help on that one!


Life only comes once, after all, and I decided to jump into the gaming industry.
Then, as time went by, I studied at school and looked for a job.
I am currently working as an effects artist.
It was my dream to work in the game industry.
After all, there are many tough situations, and sometimes I almost sigh!
However, the elation and satisfaction I felt when I experienced the moment when something I was involved in was released to the world.
I will never forget the feelings I had when I saw the various feedback from users throughout my life.

It was a difficult decision, and I still think back on it, but I also feel that I am the person I am today because I found a good match. Thank you very much.
I would not have been able to make this decision without Toha.

- Meo's comment -

 

I am a recent newcomer to 3D.
I have always wanted to try modeling people, but the hurdles were too high and I could not get into it. But thanks to this video, I was able to complete a human figure for the first time.

We appreciate it very much. Thank you for making the video.

- Comment by Imo. -

 

Hello Toha, I am a fifth-grader who has been using Blender for a few months.
I found this blog very clear and informative because with reference books it's hard!
I am now looking at Toha's blog/YouTube to build my head and body.

- Comment by yuckey. -

 

I was looking around for Blender for the first time.
I tried to do it, but since I was not very good at manipulating the three-view map, I had to do some weird things to make sure the three-view map was lined up correctly, and I pretty much stopped there.

I feel so much better now that I know that it's okay to think that way even as a beginner.

It was also very easy to read the separate articles, "This operation is detailed here," which helped me to gradually move forward with a task that had been standing still for a long time.
Thank you!

- Pixie's comment. -

 

Reading your comments, Toha, I was able to have my dream of becoming a 3D modeler again, which I had almost given up halfway. Thank you.

- Murata's comment -

 

Comments in support of

Thank you very much! I will continue to work hard at my own pace on both blogging and game production.

 

Toha
Toha

Please keep up the good work with Toha and the 3DCG life!

 

List of comments

  1. ななし says:

    I'm looking to get started with Blender, but I'm the type of person who learns by reading books, so I'm looking for recommendations. However, most of the famous books are for Blender 2.7, and there are almost no books for Blender 2.8. Is it safe to work on Blender 2.8 with Blender 2.7 books (are there any problems like functions have been modified so much that I can't understand them?)
    If there are any operational considerations, please let me know.

    • Toha トハ says:

      Thank you for your comment, Nanashi~!
      It's good to read and learn from books!

      Is it safe to operate Blender 2.8 while looking at a Blender 2.7 book? I don't recommend it.

      The reason for this is that the detailed interface (menu locations, etc.) has changed considerably between 2.7 and 2.8, and I think it will be confusing.
      Toha is the first step in getting started with Blender 2.8.Customize the UI to your liking and make it easy to useI am writing an article entitled
      When studying unfamiliar software, I get stumped because I can't figure out how to operate the software just because the images in the reference book and the software at hand look different (this is my personal opinion).
      So I would suggest choosing a book that explains as much as possible on a 2.8 screen.

      Right now, there are still only a few books that support 2.8, but if you search for keywords such as "blender 2.8 books", you will find several.
      If you wait a little longer, you may be able to find more 2.8-compliant books, but if you want to do it now, you may want to consider the 2.8-compliant books that are already available.
      Thank you very much for your understanding.

  2. ななし says:

    Thank you!!! I'll see if I can find a book that's 2.8 compliant, although there aren't many out there yet!

  3. ゆーたん says:

    Hello.
    I am a 29-year-old currently looking to start studying CG.
    My question is, does age matter in the growth of CG talent? Also, can a person without talent become a CG artist?
    I graduated from art college with a major in painting, but I lost confidence when I was told I was terrible at it. I worked in sales and other unrelated jobs, but I still want to make something, and I am wondering if I should give it a try.
    In drawing, I can express texture, but I am not good at form and spatial perception.
    I think CG requires a talent for shape and spatial awareness? I personally think that it is, and I am worried that I will not be able to compete with those who are good at it.

    • Toha トハ says:

      Thank you for your comment, Yutan.
      So you're about to start studying CG and wondering if you should try CG....
      Regarding Yutan's question, I would like to answer it in the Toha way.

      First, "Does age have anything to do with the growth potential of CG talent?" I don't think age has anything to do with the growth potential of CG talent. However, since there is not an infinite amount of time in a person's lifetime, I think that "the younger you are, the more time you have to develop your talent.

      Next, "Do you have to be talented to be a CG artist?" I didn't know what talent was, so I looked it up.
      Some dictionaries say "the innate ability to do things skillfully," but if you look up the meaning of the word in the Kojien dictionary, you will find that it means "wit and ability. The word "talent" means "the ability of an individual to acquire certain qualities or abilities through training. It says, "Talent" is certainly an innate ability, but it is not a natural talent. Talent" certainly includes innate qualities, but it seems that "ability acquired through training" is also a part of talent.
      Based on the above, Toha's response will be: 1) You cannot become a CG designer without talent, and 2) Talent can be acquired through training.
      I think it is up to each person to decide whether to give up trying because they don't have the talent at this point, or whether to train and acquire the talent and try to take on the challenge - I think it is up to each person.

      Yutan-san graduated from an art college with a major in painting, so at that point, I believe that you at least have "art-related talent". I am sure that you have studied a lot at art college, so you definitely have more talent than Tohatsu who did not go to art college. You mentioned that you are not good at recognizing shapes and space, but you can overcome your weakness by training in the future, or you can leave what you are not good at to someone who is good at it and compete in what you are good at.
      There are various types of CG to be made and different ways of making CG depending on the field. TOHA mainly creates CG for games, but there are some companies that divide the work between "model creation" and "texture creation" in the field of CG production for visual images.

      I don't know if your goal is to work for a CG company or to work as an independent CG artist, but I can't tell you if you can become a CG artist if you try, but if you don't try, the day when you can become a CG artist will never come.

      When you are thinking of trying something new, anxiety is bound to follow.
      Although I myself have quit the company and am now making computer graphics on my own, I am always anxious.
      I don't think there is anyone who has no worries in life, so I hope that you will explore various options while worrying and thinking about them, and then decide what you want to do in the future.
      And since only Yutan can make that decision!

      That is all. Thank you very much for your cooperation~.

  4. めお says:

    Dear Toha.

    I always read your blog and Twitter.
    I have asked the question before and here is the article.
    I am looking for a job as a 3DCG designer in general, as described in Q4.
    My name is Meo.
    Thank you so much for your help on that one!

    Life only comes once, after all, and I decided to jump into the gaming industry.
    Then, as time went by, I studied at school and looked for a job.
    I am currently working as an effects artist.
    It was my dream to work in the game industry.
    After all, there are many tough situations, and sometimes I almost sigh!
    However, the elation and satisfaction I felt when I experienced the moment when something I was involved in was released to the world.
    I will never forget the feelings I had when I saw the various feedback from users throughout my life.
    It was a difficult decision, and I still think back on it, but I found a good match.
    I also feel that I am where I am today.

    Thank you very much for your time.
    I would not have been able to make this decision without Toha.
    I am sorry to bother you, but I really wanted to write to thank you for your time.
    I will continue to support your activities from the shadows.

    Thank you so much!

    • Toha トハ says:

      Hello Meo, it's been a long time~!
      What a surprise! You are already working as an effects designer now~!
      Amazing! It's really greatI'm glad~>.

      Meo-san on Toha's blog.Write to me with your comments.It was about two years ago that you gave it to me, I remember it well.
      At that time, Toha even answered something that was not asked at length, but I thought it was not good to just give an irresponsible and hopeful answer, so I thought about it and wrote a thoughtful reply.
      I was prepared for the fact that it would not be easy, but still Meo-san gave it her all to try! I was still sincerely cheering her on, even if secretly.
      So I'm really happy!

      Of course it's all due to Hameo's efforts! I'll give it my all! Not many people can not only say, "I'll do my best," but also really do it and get results. I respect that.
      And even after becoming an effects designer, which was my dream, I was deeply moved to hear him say that the work is often demanding and difficult.
      I believe that the fact that you made the decision, made the effort, and are now working in the game industry will give strength and push to those who are still struggling with the same issues as you were back then.
      I would be really happy if this blog started by TOHA can be a stepping stone to something for someone else as a place for such a trigger, even if only a little.

      Meo, thank you very much for commenting again on this blog.
      It was also such good news that it made me feel a bit chipper in the New Year.
      You may encounter many difficulties in the future, but if you look back on your past efforts, I am sure that you will be able to manage them.
      We hope and pray that Meo will continue to be healthy in mind and body!

      Thank you very much for your support for TOHA - please come back to this blog anytime ^^.

Toha
Toha

Please feel free to comment~!

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